In A World Podcast – Staci Broski and 7th Row Productions

International Makeup Artist Staci Broski has a professionalism and commitment to her art that singles her out as one of the most sought after makeup artist in the fashion industry. Consistently her team is an essential asset to creative fashion teams both on the national and international stage.
For over 20 years she has worked as professional makeup artist and continues to build her reputation in the fashion, film/tv, music & commercial industry.

Staci finds her work more rewarding than ever, noting how wonderful it is to be making positive changes in the industry while working along side a great crew.
However, as on demand as she is, Staci still has that southern charm in her heart, and is well known for her kindness, sincerity and mothering attitude with everyone she works with in the industry.
www.7throw.com


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-Transcript-

Brad Burrow:
Welcome to In a World with Real Media. I’m your host Brad Burrow. In this podcast, we’ll dive into the lives of the most successful people in business. We’ll learn how they overcame adversity, took advantage of opportunities and learned from their experiences. Learn from our experts, get inspired, then go live your story. It’s In a World with Real Media.

Brad Burrow:
Hello, and welcome to In a World with Real Media. I have some very special guests today on our podcast. I’m really excited about this. We’ve been waiting for this for a while, Staci Broski and a whole group of really talented makeup artists-

Staci Broski:
Amazing ladies.

Brad Burrow:
… Chanda, Kandie, Kate, right? Excited to have you guys on the podcast. It’s really cool. I’ve been wanting to do this for a while because I like to give people a little bit of background on what we do. A lot of people don’t know the process behind making videos and movies and all those types of things and you guys are kind of behind the scenes all the time, not kind of, always and I just think it’s really cool what you guys do and you’re so good at it. With Lisa Ginter the other day-

Staci Broski:
Oh-

Brad Burrow:
… I mean, she was so happy.

Staci Broski:
… she was amazing to work with.

Brad Burrow:
People like that, I work with a lot of executives that come in and they’re on camera and they’re not prepared and they don’t necessarily look great because they’ve been working and stress and all that stuff and you just fixed all that. That was really awesome.

Staci Broski:
We didn’t get a lot of time to do it either but five minutes in the chair, that really does help.

Brad Burrow:
It only takes me about three to do mine.

Staci Broski:
I don’t know, that shinning head is more a high-maintenance than…

Brad Burrow:
Well, believe me, I’m doing some videos for Real Media and stuff and I’d look in there, it’s like it is a big beacon shooting out like this. The light just bouncing off of it.

Staci Broski:
We call those hot spots Brad.

Kate:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
[crosstalk 00:02:05]. I liked the hot part, I’m not sure about the spot part. Anyway, well, so Staci obviously talk about how you got into the business and started 7th Row Productions.

Staci Broski:
We’re going way back 20 years plus now and I was working for a talent agency and I was actually loved-

Brad Burrow:
Which agency was it?

Staci Broski:
[I & I 00:02:32].

Brad Burrow:
Oh, okay.

Staci Broski:
I & I. Back when they were kind of just growing and getting their legs off.

Brad Burrow:
You’re good.

Staci Broski:
Anyway, long story short, so I’m sitting there and a photographer comes in with a makeup artist and I love to draw and paint Trompe l’oeil pointillism, all that stuff and I was just kind of fascinated watching her and I just saw her painting and I thought I can do that. I think I can do that. I walked up to my boss at the time and I said, “Can I do a test shoot?” He said, “Well, sure,” but he can also get me for free, so I think that was one of the things that…

Staci Broski:
I walked in with my little bag of Mary Kay. I had literally nothing nor did I have the professional brushes or anything like that, but I knew how to paint. It all came together and worked out beautifully. Then I started doing more and more and more. I then started seeing when professional makeup artists that did film in television were in town and I started going and doing those conventions and watching how all of that kind of came down and worked and then did a little freelance stint at MAC Cosmetics where I met Kate.

Brad Burrow:
Is that right?

Staci Broski:
This was so many years ago. Then after a while I just started really learning the craft and different techniques from different artists because every artist has a different way of doing something. I was the classic makeup girl. When you walked into MAC, somebody would look, they would pan the room and see who they connected with the most and I always got the business ladies.

Brad Burrow:
Is that right?

Staci Broski:
It’s true.

Brad Burrow:
Huh.

Staci Broski:
After having my education in that, I just started going out on my own and it grew and grew and grew to the point where I was turning things away and I couldn’t keep up with everything so I thought, well, let me see if I can grab some makeup artists in town that I respect and know and that do an amazing job and Kate was my first. But I don’t mean it like that. But I reached out-

Brad Burrow:
Kate.

Staci Broski:
… to her and I said, “Hey Kate, would you mind-”

Brad Burrow:
It’s a whole another progress.

Kate:
You never forget your first.

Chanda:
She’s the OG.

Staci Broski:
Kate is a OG. Anyway, long story short, Kate has been my right arm for a very long time and she has stepped in to take jobs to keep it really under the umbrella of 7th Row and now we have this amazing group of girls that are just really keeping us moving and growing and it’s just been a true blessing. We’re kind of tight. This is a great tribe we have here.

Brad Burrow:
That’s awesome. I wanted to ask you, there’s somebody in your family named Fred.

Staci Broski:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
Can you talk about that, because when I… obviously I would have thought that that’s how you got into this business, but-

Staci Broski:
No.

Brad Burrow:
… that’s not the case.

Staci Broski:
That’s not the case at all. No.

Brad Burrow:
That’s surprising to me.

Staci Broski:
No. Fred Broski is my father-in-law and obviously we know that he’s been in television for 41 years-

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Staci Broski:
… and he retired as a weatherman here for TV 5. He was well-known for Bowling for Dollars and-

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Staci Broski:
… all of these amazing fun-

Brad Burrow:
That’s right.

Staci Broski:
When I run into people they always talk about it. Now I have a T-shirt now that has Bowling for Dollars, Fred Broski’s picture on it and people stop me still and he’s doing very well. His wife and he live in Olathe and I’m obviously married to his son, Brian. We’ve been married 30 years now.

Brad Burrow:
Awesome.

Staci Broski:
Everything’s well there.

Brad Burrow:
But zero to do with your career path which-

Staci Broski:
Zero to do with my career. No.

Brad Burrow:
… totally throws me off.

Staci Broski:
Absolutely.

Brad Burrow:
Kate.

Kate:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
Let’s talk about… You get two mics. Actually people on the podcast can’t see this.

Chanda:
The OG gets two mics.

Kate:
Oh my gosh.

Brad Burrow:
How does it feel to be the OG?

Kate:
I mean, it feels pretty good. I’m not going to lie, it’s nice. No, it really is just an honor to be a part of this team and going back to when we worked at MAC, I have a background in aesthetic, so I went to cosmetology school for skincare and I was sort of in that realm and Staci, she coming up to me and saying, “Hey, what do you think about joining the team?” I was like, “I mean, I’d play and make up at MAC, I’m not really ready for the commercial industry.” “You are. You’ll do fine.” Then next thing I know, I mean, I told her no for months and I’m working in a med spa and next thing I know, she’s like, “You have a test shoot. It’s going to be on this day. You show up, I’m going to help you with what you need to get there and product wise and just prep me.” She just threw me in the deep end and I was so scared and I went and it was just a test shoot..

Brad Burrow:
You were nervous there at first time.

Kate:
I was really scared because I just was insecure. She throughout this whole time has just been so encouraging and so she just believes in people and good thing, because once I went and I got over those fears then it’s like there was no turning back and now because of that I’ve experienced so many wonderful things I wouldn’t have otherwise, so many opportunities.

Brad Burrow:
You were helping private clients do makeup, but then you switched over to the commercial side?

Kate:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
That’s a whole different thing.

Kate:
It is.

Brad Burrow:
I mean, getting somebody to look good on television, on camera, different types of things that there were shooting.

Kate:
Oh, across the board for sure.

Brad Burrow:
How did you make that transition?

Kate:
It really is just, you learn as you go. I mean, you really don’t know and sometimes we even show up and don’t even know who the client is. They’ll just be real secretive. One time I went and I found out after I got there that I was working with the governor of Missouri or Kansas, Missouri, and I was like, “Oh sweet. I’m glad I put myself together today.

Brad Burrow:
You think you would want to know that though, right, I mean.

Kate:
It was just, that’s how the industry is sometimes because sometimes-

Brad Burrow:
You got to be prepared for anything then.

Staci Broski:
Anything.

Kate:
… you just don’t know. You’ll be in those situations and then other times you’ll get to work with bands or entertainers and of course movie sets. Then one time Staci called me and said, “Hey, how do you feel about working the UFC event here in Kansas City?” I was like, “I’m not a violent person, but that’s sounds kind of cool.”

Brad Burrow:
Blood splats.

Kate:
It ended up being such a cool experience and I was really glad. I just kind of reflect on those moments. I would never have just gone to that event ever, but I had the opportunity to go and work and just experience it. It’s pretty cool.

Brad Burrow:
Well, that’s awesome. You guys get to do some pretty amazing things and just your contact with celebrities, Patrick Mahomes and somebody here, let me switch to you Chanda.

Chanda:
Chanda.

Brad Burrow:
Chanda.

Chanda:
Chanda.

Brad Burrow:
Let me beat that beep.

Chanda:
Beep.

Brad Burrow:
Let me switch to you.

Chanda:
It’s the story of my life.

Brad Burrow:
In a world where Chanda is right here with me and I said her name wrong. I’m so sorry.

Staci Broski:
She’s used to it.

Brad Burrow:
Here, let me do this. It’s Chanda everybody. She’s raising the roof right now. Tell me about Clay Matthews. I hear there’s some… Does he have your cell phone number?

Chanda:
Well, unfortunately not.

Brad Burrow:
No.

Chanda:
That was the plan but it didn’t work out.

Brad Burrow:
Okay. We’ll work on that.

Chanda:
Staci and I worked on a Gillette commercial. Gosh, days was it? Four or five days? It was a few days.

Brad Burrow:
Multiple days [crosstalk 00:10:13].

Chanda:
Multiple days shoot. Yes.

Brad Burrow:
Was that here in Kansas City?

Chanda:
It was here. What was interesting about that was they had to transform Arrowhead into Green Bay stadium because Green Bay doesn’t allow anyone to step on their field.

Brad Burrow:
Oh, wow.

Chanda:
That’s how Arrowhead got that, they allow that. They had to transform that. Well, not only was it a monsoon, those-

Brad Burrow:
The day of the-

Chanda:
Oh.

Brad Burrow:
Is that right?

Chanda:
Every day we had, I mean, 5:00 AM calls, crazy days and so we had fans in the stands painted as if they were Green Bay fans with the face paint and it’s a monsoon now. You can imagine the terror we had about, ah, how are we going to take care of that. It all worked out, but not only that, it was pouring down rain so then when it stopped raining we had to keep the continuity up of making them look like it was raining, so we’re hosing all the football players down.

Brad Burrow:
They liked the look of the rain or-

Chanda:
We had to.

Brad Burrow:
… you just had to do it that way?

Chanda:
Well, we had to. We had to because it had been raining. They were out playing football, supposedly the Green Bay Packers and the New England Patriots were playing at Arrowhead. Now it’s pouring down rain and they have that, so now we have to keep up continuity. We have to hose everyone down with water bottles to make it look like they’re still wet. Cut to Clay Matthews body double, has short hair, Clay Matthews has long hair, so there’s a wig. We’ve got to it cut. Well, suddenly they needed immediately, that’s our job. We sit around and wait and then it’s like, “Now. Hurry.” We had Clay Matthews in a room, thrown in a room. We throw a wig on him. Did we have five minutes Staci?

Staci Broski:
Maybe.

Chanda:
Maybe five minutes-

Brad Burrow:
[crosstalk 00:12:25].

Chanda:
… to cut this long haired wig that they brought us to make it look like his hair and now we have to cut it to the length of his hair. We throw a wig on Clay Matthews to measure how long his hair is.

Brad Burrow:
Really? Wow.

Chanda:
Then throw it on the body double to make it look like him. Those are the things that are just thrown at you. You can be sitting around for 12 hours, but all of a sudden, bam, now we’ve decided we need those right now. We had to deal with a monsoon, a wig for a football player-

Staci Broski:
And shaving cream.

Chanda:
Oh, and the shaving cream-

Brad Burrow:
What’s that? Tell me what that is.

Chanda:
Oh my God.

Staci Broski:
When you see those commercials where they’re shaving with a… they’re showing the razor and all of that. The shaving cream, once you do it, you have to consistently get it to look the same every cut, every time. They wipe it off and they go, “Again, do it again.” And I’m like, “Chanda, I can’t make it look the same every time. Can you go over and do this for me please?” Chanda stepped in and she was able to get it to look the exact same from the last take just so when they mend this stuff together everything looks consistent.

Brad Burrow:
So that it cuts together.

Chanda:
I mean, there could have been 30 takes if not more. I mean, so-

Brad Burrow:
You put it on 30 times?

Chanda:
… every take was new shaving cream has to look the same way it did in the last shot.

Brad Burrow:
Man.

Chanda:
It wasn’t a hard day though. I mean, putting shaving cream on Clay Matthews face, it was a good day’s pay. It was worth it.

Brad Burrow:
What are some other great stories? Kate, I’m coming to you next.

Kandie:
I’m Kandie.

Staci Broski:
[inaudible 00:14:07].

Brad Burrow:
Right. Should I edit that or keep it in there? Kandie. This is the most people I’ve ever had on my podcast in a long time by the way I guess. I’m a little overwhelmed. There’s an indie film that I’m hearing about called I Am Lisa.

Kandie:
I Am Lisa. Yes. It’s a werewolf-

Brad Burrow:
You have the movie voice?

Kandie:
Yeah, I do. It’s a werewolf revenge film, female lead, which is really cool because it’s women superheroes and whatnot are really on trend right now. It was all shot here in Kansas City by Patrick Gray, who is just an incredible director and a personal friend. He said, “Listen, Kandie, if I ever get a budget and I got money to work with, I swear I’ll have you do wardrobe, I swear.” This is years ago and so finally it all came to fruition and it was a really great project. It’s done extremely well. It was number one in Redbox for two solid weeks. It’s the number one indie selling film at Walmart, which is cool. It’s now on Amazon Prime. It’s really done well for a small budget indie film out of Kansas City, which is kind of cool. I think that’s good stuff.

Brad Burrow:
Talk about that side of it, horror films. There’s a skill set to doing that right. I mean, it’s not just making somebody look good. It’s-

Kandie:
Yeah. it’s-

Brad Burrow:
… all the scars and all that stuff, that’s crazy.

Kandie:
Yeah. There’s some really talented group of people involved in that and special effects makeup and a lot of blood, a lot of wardrobe changes because… The cool thing about that is you really have to be present when you’re doing a film because you’re doing scene two today and then at the end of the week you’re doing scene 16 and they’re like, “Oh, hey, we had this really great idea in my sleep and I think we need to go back and re-shoot scene two.”

Kandie:
I would have to do a photo journal of every take, every scene, every set so I could make sure that when I went back to scene two, we need the same bloodstain, the same rip and so I had multiple wardrobes, same wardrobe just different dirt stains and bloodstains and whatnot for each day. It’s a lot. It was a lot to keep track of, but really good fun. I mean, you’re really present. You can’t take a minute off because you have to constantly be onset seeing what’s going on. Even as much as a shirt falling off the shoulder or… and those are funny because I guess film people go back and watch other people’s films, even big movie blockbusters and they’re like, “That girl went into the barn with a green shirt on and they didn’t catch it because the one she came out in is orange.” That kind of thing. It happens on big movie sets, but we did a pretty rockstar job I have to say. I was kind of impressed with myself I mean, just because it was my first full set movie. I’d done indie shorts, I’ve done a lot of commercial work, but never a full length film. That was the challenge.

Brad Burrow:
Was that your first horror film as well or?

Kandie:
Yeah, it was.

Brad Burrow:
How did you prepare for that because you’ve got to do all kinds of weird things in horror films, right?

Kandie:
Yeah. It’s kind of creepy and we were in weird parts of deep down Missouri in wooded areas. It was hot. Oh my gosh.

Staci Broski:
Middle of July.

Kandie:
Middle of July, so I mean, hot, humid, bugs, all kinds of creepy crawlers. I mean, it was arduous to say the least, but it was an experience, right? It was like, “This is a super cool experience.” Then to see it on film is just, I don’t know, there’s something about it. It’s very magical. It is, just to see it come to life.

Brad Burrow:
Staci, if I remember right, you worked on a Monday night football horror film thing. Didn’t the Chiefs play on a Halloween night or something like that? It seems like you helped on make up on something like that.

Staci Broski:
I can not recall that.

Brad Burrow:
Okay. Well, I just remember it was the thriller kind of thing and I’m pretty sure that that was… I thought that was something that you worked on.

Staci Broski:
I thought I would remember something like that, but no.

Brad Burrow:
Okay. We’ll edit. I’m really good at this guys.

Staci Broski:
I’ll be in my sleep going, “Oh, yeah. He was right.”

Brad Burrow:
Chanda.

Chanda:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
Talk about the World Series. That was a pretty cool thing.

Chanda:
It was.

Brad Burrow:
I have a story on the World Series too. I got called to take a teleprompter out to do stuff for stand up for cancer, but you got to work on the World Series.

Chanda:
We did. Staci and I both worked and luckily two years in a row. I mean, who would’ve thought.

Brad Burrow:
That wasn’t that long ago, was it?

Chanda:
No, it wasn’t that long ago. It was a lot of fun. You meet people and you think, well, it’s men on camera. How hard can that be? That seems [crosstalk 00:19:29].

Brad Burrow:
I don’t ever think that by the way.

Chanda:
But you know what, they’re out there, we’re in the sun, they’re sweating. What was also funny about that is we were on the field while the teams were doing batting practice. They basically had a net up. A net-

Brad Burrow:
Oh, to protect you from them.

Chanda:
… as a barrier for us to sit there as they’re doing batting practice.

Brad Burrow:
You were working with the MLB guys or?

Chanda:
For the MLB channel, yes.

Brad Burrow:
Okay.

Chanda:
We were doing the host for that or the commentators for that. Then Staci worked the earlier part of the day while I stayed for the later, so for the post game show.

Brad Burrow:
Oh, after the game then so.

Chanda:
Yes. Well, one of the games went, I think, 15 innings. It may have gone down as one of the longest games in World Series history.

Brad Burrow:
That was a great game by the way. I think we won that game actually.

Chanda:
We did. Yes. We were all held up in the tunnel ready to get out the ninth inning and we end up going 15 innings. I mean, I think we wrapped, and then the post game show, I think we wrapped at 2:30 in the morning or something. But it was a blast because when you’re with a crew, that’s the wonderful thing about production.

Brad Burrow:
Kind of like a family, isn’t it?

Chanda:
Everybody has to come together and do their job to make it happen-

Staci Broski:
Yes.

Chanda:
… and it’s live TV. If everybody isn’t on their game doing it exactly at the moment they need to do it, things don’t fall into place. That’s one of the wonderful things about working in these productions. You’re working with people that may be from another state coming together for the World Series, not everyone is in Kansas City that worked on it. It’s just awesome to be around people that are so on their game in every aspect of what they do to make something happen. But I mean, we ended up working till 2:30 AM and that was that, but what an experience, two years at a row.

Staci Broski:
You know what, you don’t do this every day, but it’s just based on instinct when you get together with people that you’ve never worked with in the past. I love that everybody knows what they’re doing.

Chanda:
Right.

Staci Broski:
Because it’s like I don’t want to have to tell anybody, “Hey, go out there now and touch him up.” When they say cut, you just go, you run, you do your thing and you get back to your seat and wait for the next-

Chanda:
Right. You have to know when your moment to move in is.

Staci Broski:
Yes.

Chanda:
You have to pay attention to what else is going on around you and sometimes you better not step in.

Staci Broski:
That’s right.

Chanda:
You have to pay attention to when your moment is and be on top of it.

Brad Burrow:
Do you guys all have techniques? Like you go up to Harold Reynolds and you got to… he’s sweating a little bit and getting in their face. Because every once in a while we’ll just throw a little powder on somebody just to get them by and I always feel so awkward. But you guys, what do you do to make somebody feel comfortable? “Hey, I’m just here.” Do you talk to them just like the dentist? “I’m going to talk to you while I’m drilling-”

Chanda:
Right. Well, and especially men. Women are fine with it. Men, they get nervous like, “Ah, makeup.” Basically we just, “Hey, I know this may not be your favorite part of the day, but I’m here to take care of you and make you look great.” You just kind of put them at ease. That’s another part of our job. We’re makeup artists/therapists sometimes.

Brad Burrow:
Exactly.

Chanda:
I mean, people, it’s amazing how they sit in your chair and suddenly you’re hearing a life story simply because they’re kind of vulnerable. You could be working with the CEO of whatever company and they’re powerhouses in their world, but when they sit down in the makeup chair, they’re out of their zone.

Brad Burrow:
That’s interesting.

Chanda:
They suddenly become like, “Ah.” We have to put them at ease and say, “I know this isn’t your normal thing, don’t worry. It’s going to be okay. We’re going to make you look great.” We do kind of have that job on us as well. Don’t you think?

Kate:
Totally. I was just going to add to that, that sometimes, I mean, everyone handles clients differently, but I feel people out, but I tend to kind of crack jokes like, “You’ll thank me later when you see it or you’re going to look beautiful with those real macho guys. You’re going to be so beautiful. You’re going to want to wear this out tonight on a date with your wife or whatever.”

Chanda:
Right.

Kate:
“You won’t want to take it off.” I just sort of try to break the ice and just keep it light and fun.

Brad Burrow:
Off her eye liner and lipstick too.

Kate:
Yeah. Or I’ll just tell him-

Chanda:
“You’ll glitter today.”

Kate:
Totally. I’ll talk about lashes and red lipstick and all that. It’s fun.

Brad Burrow:
Kate, I hear that you had an experience with a horse. I don’t know what that’s all about.

Chanda:
Oh, no.

Kate:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
Do you want to talk about that?

Kate:
Well, before we came here I was just thinking about kind of coming back to what I said earlier, just all the things that we’ve all had an opportunity to experience, these events and memories and things that I was reflecting on. Oh my gosh, I would have never gone to a horse ranch to film whatever. It was the longest Staci.

Staci Broski:
The calender [crosstalk 00:25:10].

Kate:
It was a calendar shoot, and Staci and I went and she’s like, “Do you want to go do this with me? It’s out-”

Staci Broski:
Lexington.

Kate:
“… Lexington and we’ll stay in a bunker and it’ll be so fun.” I’m kind of afraid of horses. To be honest, I think they’re so beautiful, but they’re so huge and I’m not a big person and I’m like, “They’re going to smash me and stump on me and I’m going to go flying.” And Staci’s like, “Oh.” She’s an animal lover and just connects with every animal, anything that… a fish, she could be looking at a fish and connecting with their soul and I’m just like, “Oh my God.” Anyway, it’s so true.

Brad Burrow:
That’s new information.

Kate:
It’s so true. She loves all animals.

Brad Burrow:
I’m going to clap that one. Good job, Staci. I don’t have any fish sounds.

Kate:
After we were done wrapping one day, she asked if I wanted to join her on a little horse ride and we were in… I don’t know any of these terms.

Staci Broski:
The Corral.

Kate:
Corral, thank you. She gets on the horse and I’m watching her like, “Oh, that looks really like a good time. Maybe I’ll just be brave and do it.”

Staci Broski:
[crosstalk 00:26:11].

Kate:
All these horses are actually actors. They are used in Civil War re-enactments and things like that so they’re professionals and she-

Staci Broski:
As are you.

Kate:
Oh, totally.

Staci Broski:
You’re both professionals.

Kate:
I get on this thing, she gets off, she’s all graceful and just wonderful and I get on and right when I get on, I realize-

Staci Broski:
Oh, no.

Kate:
… that Staci is 6’5″ foot and I’m 4’11” and the stirrups are not near me at all and I don’t know how to get them near me and I’m like, “Staci…” and then it was too late. That horse took off.

Chanda:
It you barebacking.

Kate:
Yeah. It was like a bear bag and all my fears came into reality. I was like…

Chanda:
Goofy on a horse.

Kate:
Then somebody yelled, “They can smell your fear, don’t fear. You need to be brave. You need to take control, be the boss,” and all these kinds of things and I’m like, “Ah, I’m going to hit [inaudible 00:27:02].” I’m flopping all around.

Chanda:
Oh my gosh.

Brad Burrow:
Is there a video of this anywhere?

Kate:
It was horrible. I really thought I was going to die that day, but I didn’t and it was just a fun memory and I kind of forgot about it and so she’s like, “Try to think of something that I like.”

Staci Broski:
That’s what happens with trauma.

Chanda:
I know.

Staci Broski:
You bury it-

Kate:
You bury it.

Staci Broski:
… [crosstalk 00:27:22].

Brad Burrow:
You’re going to need some therapy after this probably.

Kate:
I know. Exactly. But it’s something that I don’t regret. I’m glad that I was open to that experience and it’s just one of many. There’s so many memories like that. “Man, I would never have thought that I would be doing this or that and it happened and it’s awesome.”

Brad Burrow:
How do you do makeup for a horse?

Kate:
It takes hours. Airbrush, lots of hair spray.

Brad Burrow:
The eyes, it’s probably a lot of work to get those-

Chanda:
Those hooves, oh.

Kandie:
You think your nails are bad, right, geez.

Brad Burrow:
That’s really cool. I bet you guys do get into some really interesting situations, right? I mean, and you don’t know they’re coming, right?

Staci Broski:
A lot of times you don’t.

Kandie:
A lot of times we don’t.

Kate:
You don’t.

Brad Burrow:
All right. Kandie, I want to switch back to you talk about wardrobe. We have a project coming. It’s going to be a while before it happens, but we’re going to be doing a feature film on James Naismith-

Kandie:
Oh, wow.

Brad Burrow:
… the story of James Naismith, but it’s-

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:28:20].

Brad Burrow:
… a period piece.

Kandie:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
There’ll be a lot of 1800s, early 1900s type of wardrobe. Does that get you excited thinking, ah, I could really-

Kandie:
Oh my gosh, absolutely and I’m a history buff, so totally love that whole concept of reproducing films or characters from the early 18 or 1900s I think that’s just great. I think that’s authenticity, right? It’s really doing your research, really going back through history and I have books and books from when I studied fashion on period pieces and all of that. You kind of know what was going on at that timeframe and obviously keeping the wardrobe as current to the project as possible. I mean, it’s a little more difficult than doing something in the present, but the cool thing about wardrobe is that it’s a timestamp, right? Whatever you’re doing at that moment, whether it’s a commercial for H&R Block or whatever, I mean, you go back and you look at that from two, three, four years ago and there’s a timestamp on wardrobe. I mean, it’s all based on the colors that were trending that particular season or the style of the cut of a jacket or a blouse.

Brad Burrow:
You’ll go back and look at that actual-

Kandie:
Absolutely. You have to make sure that… I mean, and sometimes there’s wardrobe that’s like, “We need to have this so that we’ve got some longevity with it, right? We don’t want this… we’re going to have to use us for five or six years or whatever.” Then the way that you approach wardrobe that way is to really do things that are pretty classic styles, right, that are timeless in a sense, that can maybe span a time period of five to eight years or whatever. Those are your basic navies and blacks and that kind of thing. But even something as a collar or a cuff on a blouse or those kinds of things. It’s a lot of attention to detail, which I totally get off on. I think that’s awesome.

Brad Burrow:
What does that process look like? And really for the listeners talk about, so from day one, I have engaged with you to help me with wardrobe on-

Kandie:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
… a film.

Kandie:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
Talk through that process. I’m just really curious to know what that is. Research and-

Kandie:
Well, you develop the character-

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Kandie:
… so who’s your character, what are their characteristics, what are their personality traits, what kind of… You kind of delve into the personality because even in a period piece like that, there are different styles within a period, right? Certain women may wear this with this personality trait or maybe more have a tendency. Then there’s always trends in every different part of history. I think you start with the character and then you build on the character and then kind of build the wardrobe based on the period pieces and the personality of the person and what kind of personality you want this person to exude. Wardrobe, I mean, all of us sitting here have a different sense of style. You have your sense of style.

Brad Burrow:
Not much. It’s something.

Kandie:
Well, and that’s a style itself, is no style at all, so there you go, right?

Brad Burrow:
Thank you. Thank so much.

Kandie:
You’re welcome.

Brad Burrow:
The crowd really like that.

Kandie:
I know. You’re a crowd pleaser. I think just to really sum it up, it’s who’s your character, what are their characteristics, how do we build on that based on the period of clothing at that time. Then just really create that and then the consistency of creating that throughout the whole piece that this person doesn’t change from this style to this style to this style. This is who they are, this is their style, this is what they’re comfortable in, this is a reflection of their personality and then that’s how you build depth in a character.

Brad Burrow:
What kind of timeframe are you looking at for something like this? The other question is where do you find-

Kandie:
There’re wardrobe houses.

Brad Burrow:
… or can you tell us [crosstalk 00:32:09].

Kandie:
There’s wardrobe houses and now with the internet, I mean, you sort of got the world at your disposal for the most part, so I do a lot of research and development as far as wardrobe. I did that for the film as well and ordered a lot of different things from… and I’d watch other film sets and sort of see how they develop their client. I mean, there’s so much at our disposal and there’s places right here in Kansas City, there’s great costume houses that have period pieces.

Kandie:
I’ve done some stuff with PBS before and so they also have resources. It’s just what we do, so I think it’s sort of in our little repertoire. You develop your industry based on what you do, so we sort of have our little bag of tricks that we in our closet that we pull out too to kind of wow you every once in a while. Can’t give away all the details.

Brad Burrow:
You could tell us but you’d have to kill us.

Kandie:
I would and I know people that know people. I’m just saying. You don’t even know it-

Brad Burrow:
Forget about it.

Kandie:
… it was me. Forget about it.

Brad Burrow:
I like that. Staci, I’m going to ask you this question, how do you prepare for any scenario? You guys can all jump in on this, but it seems that’s kind of what you do every day. I mean-

Staci Broski:
[crosstalk 00:33:27] prepare for anything?

Brad Burrow:
Well, I mean, right? You got to have-

Staci Broski:
You have to just have everything under the sun that you can think of-

Kate:
A wagon.

Staci Broski:
… a whole wagon wheel of stuff if you want to say that Kate.

Kate:
Literally.

Staci Broski:
Literally.

Chanda:
90%-

Brad Burrow:
You’ve got [crosstalk 00:33:38].

Chanda:
… sometimes 75% of what we carry around as a what if.

Staci Broski:
Yep, that’s it.

Brad Burrow:
Is that right?

Staci Broski:
That’s it.

Kandie:
Well, with wardrobe-

Chanda:
And if you don’t have it, you need it, someone ask for it.

Kandie:
… well, wardrobe and the thing with wardrobe is you’ll do a commercial and they’ll have all these extras and they’ll do a very detailed, this is what you’re supposed to wear, these are the color palettes, whatnot, and they’ll show up and you’re like, “Oh my gosh, do you read?”

Staci Broski:
Right.

Kandie:
Seriously, I mean, totally-

Brad Burrow:
Not even close to what they were asking for.

Kandie:
Not even close. You have to have wardrobe for the extras even, which is-

Brad Burrow:
You come prepared with wardrobe for extras?

Kandie:
You have to come prepared-

Brad Burrow:
Wow.

Kandie:
… for the extra people on set, who obviously didn’t read the memo. Yes, absolutely. Or read it or misinterpreted it.

Brad Burrow:
I mean, what do you guys think as far as the makeup side? I mean, so I remember-

Chanda:
[crosstalk 00:34:26].

Brad Burrow:
… you walking in here, you’ve got a-

Chanda:
… on the easy end I think for me, because if somebody says, “Hey, go give her a smoky eye, give her a natural.” I mean, I’m prepared. I’m prepared for anything they ask. Now if they want a clown face, well, you probably should ask me because then I need to go and grab some paint. Let’s know that ahead of time please.

Brad Burrow:
You get asked that a lot?

Chanda:
No. Usually no.

Brad Burrow:
“We were expecting a clown face today.”

Chanda:
“First we wanted the smokey eye, now we wanted the clown look.” But the thing is, you really do have to be prepared for anything to come up. I mean, from someone suddenly needs a toothbrush because they-

Kate:
Or a beard trimmer-

Chanda:
Or a beard trimmer-

Kate:
… or nail clippers or eye drops.

Chanda:
Yes. I mean it’s just-

Kate:
Literally, these are the things.

Chanda:
They expect us to have everything from dental floss to face paint. I mean, it’s-

Kate:
We feel like Mary Poppins most of the time.

Chanda:
We do. We really do.

Kate:
And over the years, for me personally I would have the basics, but if someone would ask, do you have this, and I wouldn’t have it, I would just write it down and go immediately after and get. Over the years you just kind of figure out, you never thought you would need, for instance, a Febreze wrinkle release.

Chanda:
[crosstalk 00:35:43]. Yes.

Kate:
I didn’t know that at the very beginning, but now I do. You add it and you keep it in you bag the tricks.

Chanda:
I’ve joked before on set that if a natural disaster happens… One time I was at the speedway for NASCAR on a job and suddenly a Tornado’s rolling in. Now we’re out at the Speedway-

Brad Burrow:
I think I remember that day.

Chanda:
… and it’s like, “Oh-oh.” I said, “The good news is what’s in my setback now we can all survive on for two weeks. We got it.”

Kate:
You even have snacks.

Chanda:
Yes.

Kate:
You bring snacks.

Chanda:
Snacks, yes.

Kate:
[crosstalk 00:36:25].

Kandie:
It’s like the mom’s diaper bag of tricks where you’re just-

Chanda:
We are the moms of the crew.

Kandie:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
You like, “We’re okay.”

Chanda:
We are the moms of the crew.

Brad Burrow:
“I got it.”

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:36:34].

Staci Broski:
They’re like, “Follow Chanda, she’s got the bag.”

Brad Burrow:
That’s really funny. Well, I saw even when you came in for our little deal, I mean, all the stuff you brought, lights, chairs-

Staci Broski:
Right. Its over-prepared. I just have to be over-prepared just in case somebody asks for something even though that, that job only took just a few short minutes and I didn’t get to use everything that I had out, that’s okay. If you had come back and say, “We need a little bit more time with her or something,” I would have been like, “Great. Here we go.”

Brad Burrow:
Awesome. All right. I want you guys to all think about the weirdest thing that’s happened to you in your career. I mean, everybody wants to hear some of these stories. Can you think of anything like that, something crazy-

Chanda:
[crosstalk 00:37:18].

Brad Burrow:
… that happened?

Chanda:
Oh, boy.

Kate:
I don’t know if it would be in the category of weird, but a challenge that I faced was Bridezillas, which we do live in Kansas City. People are cool here.

Brad Burrow:
Bridezilla.

Kate:
I mean, we don’t get a lot of brideszillas, so I kind of wasn’t prepared for what happens the day-

Chanda:
[crosstalk 00:37:37] and was I with you?

Brad Burrow:
Do I need to beep out [crosstalk 00:37:40].

Kate:
I don’t know. I’m not going to give away too many details because it is Kansas City-

Brad Burrow:
No, we want details.

Kate:
… and we don’t want to… “Oh, I know who that was, I was there.”

Chanda:
[crosstalk 00:37:49].

Staci Broski:
I was a bridesmaid.

Kate:
But I’ll just give some bullet points of what happened. I did a trial run with this individual and I was the third person to do the trial, which-

Brad Burrow:
A trial run, so they actually had you come do the makeup and-

Kate:
Yes. To make sure you know what you’re doing and you do what they want and all that.

Brad Burrow:
Oh my gosh.

Kate:
But I was the third person, so she had already fired two people and then I came along.

Brad Burrow:
Did you know that?

Kate:
Yeah, she told me, so I knew pressure was on-

Brad Burrow:
Oh my goodness.

Kate:
… and that she was picky. I wrote down a document and took pictures of all the product they use, I took pictures. I wanted it to be exactly like the trial, the day off. The day off she got her hair done first and I could hear her kind of going off on her hairstylist and they were kind of bickering and I was like, “Oh, that’s not good.” She comes over to me, I do her makeup-

Brad Burrow:
Oh my gosh.

Kate:
… and then as soon as she sees her makeup, she loses it. She’s like, “This is not what we did,” and just went off. “I don’t like it and blah, blah, blah.” I literally was like… All the blood left my face and I was like, “Oh my gosh, this is my worst nightmare.” Because our goal is to make people happy and when someone is unhappy, then it just… you’re like, “What am I going to do?” Well, a side note is I’m with her for the entire day. She hired me throughout the wedding, after the reception, all the pictures, everything, so I’m stuck with this person. I can’t just go off on her and leave. I have to endure it.

Kate:
I actually had to step away and gather myself and calm down, maybe say a little prayer and I came back and I was like, “You know what, it’s makeup, it can be fixed, it’s not permanent, we’re going to get it right, so let’s sit down and you walk me through what you’re not happy with and let’s fix it. It’s your day, it’s going to be all right.” I had to talk her off the ledge and just be a therapist like Chanda said. Literally she calmed down, we fixed it and then literally minutes later I heard her mom say, “Honey, have you taken your medication?” I was like, “It’s not me, it’s not personal.”

Kate:
Literally, I could probably spend an hour-

Brad Burrow:
Oh my goodness.

Kate:
… talking about all the things that happened. It was not a good day. By the end of it, she ended up… one little funny side note she liked the maid of honor’s eyelashes better than hers and made her… they were already glued on her eyes-

Chanda:
No.

Kate:
… made her take them off and made me take hers off and put those on. These are the kinds of things and this might give it away, I hope it doesn’t, you can edit it out, but the bridesmaid got out of the limo and ripped the entire back of her dress and I had my set bag for some reason, I guess because I was with her the whole day. I had safety pins and literally it was like a fashion. You would have died Kandie.

Chanda:
Oh my God.

Kate:
I put 18,000 safety pins because literally she had no… What do you do?

Kandie:
It’s a new trend.

Kate:
Yeah. I was like, “This is a little edgy. I mean, this is a little edgy.” She was in tears. It was crazy. The bride at the end unfortunately, I stayed over time, I ended up staying an hour or two more than I was supposed to just trying to make her happy and when I left, she was bawling he was getting ready to go out to her reception and was crying because she was upset with the family member and I just walked over and I was like, “Thank you.” I just tried to leave it on a good note and I felt good. When I got in my car, I was like, “I gave up everything I had today and I’m proud of myself for being an adult.”

Staci Broski:
It’s hard.

Kate:
It is.

Brad Burrow:
Oh my gosh.

Kate:
That’s just the example of like-

Chanda:
Her poor husband.

Kate:
I know. I actually felt that way.

Brad Burrow:
I know. Can you imagine.

Staci Broski:
[crosstalk 00:41:17].

Kate:
Well, the crazy part, a follow-up, she ended up emailing and hired me to come back because she hated all of her pictures and so we re-did.

Kandie:
Oh my God.

Kate:
We did a whole separate shoot and she-

Brad Burrow:
You said yes?

Kate:
I did and I went back and it was fine. I was like, “We’re cool, everything’s cool.”

Chanda:
It’s not you, it’s me.

Kate:
It was her.

Chanda:
That was the [crosstalk 00:41:36].

Kate:
We went around for three hours doing photos by the way, so her wedding day.

Chanda:
Wow.

Kate:
I felt proud and I even ran into her on a commercial shoot after that, where she worked and she was nice as can be. I’m like, “I just don’t think you were supposed to have a big wedding. Maybe you should have eloped but I don’t know. It doesn’t matter now.”

Brad Burrow:
Maybe not get married at all.

Chanda:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
Maybe that was a bad-

Chanda:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
… decision.

Kandie:
Wonder if she’s still married.

Kate:
I think so. There’s too many clues, I really hope…

Brad Burrow:
Anybody else got any great stories like that?

Kandie:
When we were doing I Am Lisa, so this is funny, we were in a park and it’s a children’s playground and it’s the bloodiest scene in the entire film and they’re ripping the neck out of… The werewolf is taking the neck out of… It sounds a little graphic, you can edit this. but She’s ripping the neck out of this police officer guy who’s kind of rogue. He’s just kind of a bad apple and has been bullying her and has just been… You have to see the film here. But anyway, so we’re on a children’s playground and it’s in the evening and it’s dark and we’re shooting and you have one shot because you’ve got this scene where the skin is ripped open and there’s flesh over the top and there’s a blood bag underneath so and she has to hit it just right so the blood just [inaudible 00:43:04] and looks really cool and authentic.

Brad Burrow:
Blood bag, huh?.

Kandie:
Yeah. We’re all around and we’re all huddled down and the camera’s up really uptight and close and so she hits it just right. I mean, it sprays all over the camera. It sprays all over everyone. I mean, it’s just this gory scene and everyone’s laughing. They’re like, “Oh my God.”

Brad Burrow:
That was awesome.

Kandie:
That was so awesome. Then everyone’s just packing up to go and I’m like, “We better clean this up because there’s going to be kids on the playground in the morning. It’s a total crime scene, right?”

Chanda:
Blood bag.

Kandie:
It’s like, “Oh my gosh.” It just hit us, we’re like, “Oh yeah, right. We better make sure we know there’s nothing left and there’s no blood on the-”

Staci Broski:
The slide.

Kandie:
“… slide or whatever.”

Brad Burrow:
Can you imagine somebody coming out there the next day?

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:43:52].

Kate:
Little kid goes on the slide and it’s bloody.

Brad Burrow:
“Mom, look at this.”

Kandie:
I mean, we’re talking like a major crime scene. It was just-

Staci Broski:
[crosstalk 00:44:00].

Kandie:
That was good stuff but anyway.

Brad Burrow:
Do you have to tell-

Kate:
Staci and I were extras in that.

Brad Burrow:
Oh, really?

Kandie:
Yes. They were.

Brad Burrow:
Is that right.

Staci Broski:
Yeah.

Kate:
Which was not planned.

Kandie:
But it’s so funny because Staci is pretty recognizable and Patrick’s a friend of ours he’s like, “Staci can you turn your head.” Because everyone-

Chanda:
We’re going to know it’s you.

Kandie:
… fricking knows that hair girl.

Chanda:
There’s Broski.

Kandie:
There’s Broski.

Chanda:
There’s Broski in the background.

Brad Burrow:
Did you guys get eaten by the werewolf or?

Kate:
No, we were in a bar. We were just chit chatting and it was funny because they told us to mouth like move our lips but don’t say anything and so Staci and I are just so funny with each other anyway, so we just kept laughing because I was like, [inaudible 00:44:35]. Then we couldn’t look at each other because we would just laugh, so that was another fun experience we weren’t planning and we just came to watch Kandie in action and next thing you know-

Kandie:
It’s a good show.

Kate:
… they’re like, “Can you step in?”

Chanda:
Next thing you know you’re in the credits.

Kate:
Right.

Brad Burrow:
I’m convinced now that we need to do a documentary following you guys around.

Staci Broski:
Oh my gosh. It’d be good fun. [crosstalk 00:44:57].

Brad Burrow:
Wouldn’t that be fun?

Staci Broski:
Oh my God. It’d be so fun. [crosstalk 00:44:59].

Brad Burrow:
It’s like the Seinfeld show or something like that-

Staci Broski:
Yes.

Brad Burrow:
… where we record all of the interactions you have with talents.

Chanda:
The shenanigans of 7th Row.

Kandie:
Real life is good entertainment. I think we figured that out in reality TV, right? It’s better-

Chanda:
Yes.

Kandie:
… than fiction. It’s like, “This really happened, man. It’s awesome.”

Chanda:
I had to talk and it was during I think the second World Series we were on and Andie MacDowell, the fabulous Andie MacDowell came into town, so I went to do her hair and makeup for… We’re in the suite of a hotel of course, the windows are open, tornado sirens are going off, another tornado story. Somehow when I work, tornadoes-

Brad Burrow:
They are attracted to you.

Chanda:
They are.

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:45:47] denominator.

Chanda:
Well, she of course is not used to that.

Brad Burrow:
She’s freaking out then.

Chanda:
She’s freaking out and I’m like, “Don’t worry about it, this is normal. Don’t worry about it”

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:45:58]. Did you see Wizard of Oz?

Brad Burrow:
It might blow the windows out but you’ll be good.

Chanda:
She’s like, “Oh my God, are we going to be okay?” I literally had to talk her down.

Kandie:
Well, the wizard of Oz has said a lot-

Chanda:
Everything was okay.

Kandie:
… of really kind of scary things in people’s minds that don’t live here.

Brad Burrow:
Yeah.

Chanda:
Yes. Lo and behold she’s the coolest person. I loved her, one of the coolest human beings on the planet, loved her but again, therapist/makeup artists-

Kandie:
Trauma.

Chanda:
… had to talk her down from being panicked that we might be in a tornado. I’m like, “It’ll pass. Even if it touches down, we’ll be fine. Don’t worry, I got you.” I get in my set bag-

Brad Burrow:
Did you tell her you had enough food for two days?

Chanda:
I did. My setback, we will survive. There’s a tent-

Kandie:
Did you teach her how to tuck and roll and to hide under the desk?

Chanda:
Yes, right?

Kandie:
Those are basics we learned in elementary school when you live in the Midwest. It’s a thing.

Brad Burrow:
Well, see, I’m convinced we need to do it behind the scenes documentary with you guys.

Chanda:
That’d be fun for when we have a job where we’re all together.

Brad Burrow:
Oh yeah.

Chanda:
Yes.

Kandie:
Then you could fast forward and look like we work super fast. You know what I mean?

Brad Burrow:
We have a button for that.

Kandie:
[crosstalk 00:47:10] team is so fast, geez.

Brad Burrow:
It’s call the fast forward button or something.

Kandie:
It’s awesome.

Brad Burrow:
We’re the only ones in the whole Kansas City that has one of those buttons.

Kandie:
That’s it? Wow.

Brad Burrow:
It’s amazing?

Kandie:
It’s super cool.

Chanda:
You so high tech.

Brad Burrow:
I know it.

Kandie:
Wow. Cutting edge.

Brad Burrow:
We have things with lots of lights that flicker too, which is really cool.

Kandie:
Oh, yeah. People like lights.

Brad Burrow:
They do.

Kandie:
It’s like, “Oh, a light.”

Chanda:
[inaudible 00:47:30] disco light? I was expecting a disco light in here.

Brad Burrow:
Well, I’ll have that next time.

Chanda:
Step it up.

Kate:
That’s the point-

Brad Burrow:
I’ll try to get on that.

Kandie:
Step up the game.

Brad Burrow:
All right. We’re about to wrap up. Tell me what do you got going? What are some neat new things that you’re going to be able to do? Or what would you say to a producer maybe that’s thinking of hiring you?

Staci Broski:
Oh, call.

Brad Burrow:
[crosstalk 00:47:50].

Chanda:
Call us.

Brad Burrow:
Call me.

Staci Broski:
Call us.

Kate:
Call me.

Kandie:
Call me.

Staci Broski:
I am the Madame of makeup here in town.

Kate:
She is.

Kandie:
Right, and I got my girls ready to go.

Brad Burrow:
That’s why we need to do the documentary.

Staci Broski:
You know what, I wanted to talk to you about manifesting a celebrity in our life.

Brad Burrow:
Oh yeah?

Staci Broski:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). I think it was one of the questions.

Brad Burrow:
Oh-oh, I missed a question.

Staci Broski:
No, I’m so excited about… This is really a very cool experience and I’m excited to share it with everybody. I don’t really name drop a lot with people that we work with, but I was watching The Notebook and I’d watched it a couple of times and I thought, oh my God, I want to work with Nicholas Sparks, right? I don’t know how that’s going to happen, when, where, what, I just put it out in the universe, right?

Staci Broski:
Couple of weeks later, I get an actual email from the fantastic Cindy Rogers who was working for a company at the time and she said, “I can’t tell you who it is, there’s a lot of moving parts, but are you available for this day and the day after that?” I said, “Sure.” I put it on, it was a hold, nothing was confirmed and then I received the final confirmation and when I got the call sheet, I looked immediately to the talent and it was Nicholas Sparks.

Kate:
Wow.

Staci Broski:
I got to groom him for a couple of days. I know that sounds really bad, but [crosstalk 00:49:14].

Kandie:
I was going to say that might need to be edited out.

Brad Burrow:
I’m going to give you a hand for that.

Staci Broski:
But it was really neat because I went to the hotel and as I was sitting up, he says, “I challenge myself to do 2,500 words a day so while you’re setting up, I’m going to be over here on my computer and I’m going to be working on..” his next novel. That was just an amazing-

Brad Burrow:
Can you tell us what it is?

Staci Broski:
I couldn’t. No, I didn’t know at the time and I still don’t know it.

Brad Burrow:
We could break it live right here on the In a World-

Kandie:
We could.

Brad Burrow:
… podcast.

Staci Broski:
But the cool thing about this is you still have to be that professional person, right? You can’t go and be like, “Oh my God, I manifested you.” You can’t say stuff like that.

Chanda:
It was my storyboards.

Staci Broski:
[inaudible 00:49:58].

Kandie:
I got a shrine of you in my studio.

Staci Broski:
No, you have to be super profesh.

Kandie:
Do you want to see it?

Staci Broski:
But it was just a very nice highlight to my career.

Brad Burrow:
That’s a really interesting thing that you’re talking about though and I’m a big believer in that too. We did a lot of sports work back in the day. We’d work with, I’d do head shots for the Reds and the Chiefs and the Royals and stuff and people just want to be treated normal-

Staci Broski:
That’s right.

Brad Burrow:
… in those situations. But I’ve seen people walk in and really be star struck and it’s just so awkward when that happens. There’s a real skill to that, isn’t there?

Staci Broski:
There is. You just have to hold back.

Brad Burrow:
Hold back.

Chanda:
Sometimes the celebrities are just as uncomfortable because just what you said.

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Chanda:
They want to be treated normal. Just be normal.

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Chanda:
Because that kind of sets the pace for their day of being on camera. Like sports guys, they’re not actors. They’re not-

Brad Burrow:
They’re just regular-

Chanda:
… necessarily comfortable being on camera. If they sit down, because we’re the first person, either wardrobe or hair and makeup, we’re the ones who greet them. If we are like, “Oh my God,” that kind of sets the pace for the day for them. We’ve got to act normal, just like if the camera guy is acting like a crazy fan, that’s not going to put them in the spot they need to be in.

Brad Burrow:
Right.

Chanda:
You know that again [crosstalk 00:51:32].

Kandie:
Talking about manifestation and obviously you said that’s kind of a cool thing for you too, so I had been a producer on a film many years ago called Change For a Dollar that just was this really cool kind of heartfelt film that did incredible. We took it to all kinds of indie film festivals and it was produced here in Kansas City as well and fast forward 12 years and I’m on the set of, I Am Lisa and three of the actors that were in that film that were just getting started in the industry, brand new, and just kind of getting their sea legs or whatnot, were in that film.

Kandie:
It’s just kind of the world that we live in, I mean, you meet all these creative artistic people and you realize that the art community in Kansas City is really amazing and very tight knit and everyone’s there to help. We had women in film help with that first film. We had amazing cameramen that had worked on local television stations and they’re like, “This is an amazing little film. We need to make this film and it’s got a Kansas City stamp on it, so we’re all going to come to the table.” That’s the thing with indie films is because you’ve got limited budgets, but you can still have amazingly talented people because it’s an art form. It isn’t always about the money. It’s about creating something that endures and something… I mean, when you put something on film, I mean, it’s there forever.

Kandie:
There’s some cool legacy attached to the kind of things that we do and everything’s in print. It’s like now in the digital era, everything we’ve done is out there for the world to see forever, which is just really cool.

Brad Burrow:
I love your point. I mean, Kansas City really is a really cool community.

Kandie:
It is.

Brad Burrow:
And it’s growing right now in the production side. A lot of films being done here.

Kandie:
Especially with Hallmark here as well. I mean, we’ve got great entities that really are pushing the envelope too and Kansas City is a friendly Midwestern city.

Chanda:
It is.

Kandie:
It’s like, “Welcome, we want you here.”

Chanda:
It is.

Kandie:
Obviously the sports have put us in a really wonderful place and a lot of good press about the Super Bowl and winning the World Series. It’s good energy right now in this city and I think it just needs to keep growing.

Chanda:
Well, it is and that’s one thing people need to understand about Kansas City. I lived in LA for 20 years and had a career there. My friends there are saying, “You’re as busy as you were out here in LA.” That’s something to say about Kansas City. There’s a lot going on here.

Brad Burrow:
Have you seen that change though? Has it picked up momentum over the last few years?

Chanda:
I think so. I mean, I think so. Don’t you ladies think so? I mean because you guys were here doing it here before I was.

Staci Broski:
Yeah, and we were steady then.

Chanda:
I was the newbie coming in. I moved back about nine years ago. There was a whole nother crazy story about that, how Staci and I got reconnected. That would take up too much time, but… or got connected in the first place.

Staci Broski:
Well, we’re related.

Brad Burrow:
I like how you-

Chanda:
We’re related.

Brad Burrow:
… we’re related. Yes.

Staci Broski:
It’s a cool story.

Chanda:
But it’s just, this city has a lot going on and we’ve got great crews here. It’s a great city and there’s a lot going on here with production.

Brad Burrow:
It’s awesome.

Chanda:
It is.

Brad Burrow:
Well, I want to wrap up. We’re about at our timeframe here. How can we get ahold of you? A producer hears this and they’re like, “I want to work with you.”

Chanda:
Oh.

Brad Burrow:
What are the next steps? I know call-

Chanda:
I love it.

Brad Burrow:
… but give us all the information.

Chanda:
Call, email.

Staci Broski:
Listen, we have a brand new website that we’re just getting ready to launch here in a little while.

Chanda:
Oh, really?

Staci Broski:
We’re revising it and Kandie’s daughter, Tiffany is an amazing branding person.

Chanda:
Okay, good.

Staci Broski:
She is taking that on. It will be www.7throw.com. That is 7-T-H-R-O-W.com. Email is perfect as well, and that is 7throwproductions@gmail.com, so it’s just like it’s spelled out, 7-T-H-R-O-W-productions@gmail.com and call, (816) 309-8459.

Brad Burrow:
What information would they need to provide you for you to be able to say here’s what you need?

Staci Broski:
Details. Just give us the details because a lot of times I’ll get, “Hey, are you available this day?” And I’m like, “Can you give me the details because once I…”

Kandie:
Just the facts ma’am.

Staci Broski:
Just the facts. Because once I start reaching out to these lovely ladies, they’re going to want a little bit more than, “Hey, I can put that on hold.” I mean, is it a full day, half day?

Kate:
How many talent?

Staci Broski:
How many talents? What are you planning? Just to even put the bullet points down of what to expect and then we can build from there, but that’s easy as that.

Brad Burrow:
Do you want to talk about your roster at all? I mean, I know all that’s on, excuse me, on the website, but I don’t know if you want to mention, I saw nine or 12 different artists on your-

Staci Broski:
One of them moved away recently, so we are getting ready to revise that too but we’ve got Chanda, Carla, Kate, Kandie, myself. We have [Aida 00:56:49] and Aubrey and we are working with another girl right now who is kind of filling in for us today actually. There’s a T-Mobile shoot going on and Kate did yesterday and because we’ve all committed to be here today, I reached out to one of our-

Brad Burrow:
Thank you.

Staci Broski:
Yes, thank you. She’s our sub today and she’s filling in for that.

Brad Burrow:
You can really cover a lot of different things happening at the same time.

Staci Broski:
Oh, we can all be like… all five of us could be on a job in different places in Kansas City on the same day, if we had to. That’s what building a crew like that has really helped us sustain a viable business here.

Brad Burrow:
Well, thank you guys so much for being a part of this. I really appreciate it and share it and let’s get the information out there. That was fun.

Kate:
Thank you. [crosstalk 00:57:41].

Kandie:
Thank you.

Chanda:
Thank you for hang us.

Staci Broski:
Thank you.

Kate:
Thank you.

Brad Burrow:
Now, wait before we go, way to go guys. The studio audience here is amazing.

Kate:
Oh my gosh.

Brad Burrow:
All right. This is the In a World with… Oh, that was the one thing I was going to have you guys do. You all have to give me an In a World? Give me the movie voice. Chanda, you want to go first?

Staci Broski:
[crosstalk 00:58:01].

Brad Burrow:
Here we go.

Staci Broski:
In a World.

Brad Burrow:
Now it’s Chanda.

Chanda:
In a World.

Brad Burrow:
Okay.

Kate:
In a World.

Kandie:
In a World.

Brad Burrow:
There you have it. Thanks for listening. We will see you guys next time. This has been In a World with Real Media. Thanks for joining us and be sure to subscribe on iTunes and follow Real Media on Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn so you never miss an episode.

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